Solitude

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A roll of color 35mm film dedicated to the abstract idea of capturing spontaneous moments of "solitude".  I find the very "practice" of landscape photography to be both therapeutic and meditational.  Most of  the images were made as soon my visual field and mind perceived a sense of "solitude" by what was "seen" and "felt". After the images were made into prints I used the best ones to then create short sound clips using acoustic guitar and ambient field recordings. The goal was to amplify the feeling of solitude by involving another sensation, in this case ears. Furthermore, each image and sound clip were the result of improvisation both in the original capture of the image and my musical reaction to it. Therefore, one could say the the work has a strong sense of "reciprocal determination" or "free play" not unlike jazz. The sound was recorded using the voice memo on my iphone 5. This was only after I spent a few hours composing music using software but determined the work deviated too much from it's original spontaneous nature and decided to keep things much simpler. 

Camera: Minolta x-700

Film: Fuji Natura1600

What I learned: This project was very fun and effortless to shoot but much harder to edit and create since the idea was very "conceptual" and "subjective". Furthermore, there was some issues with film choice. After seeing the final results it quickly became apparent that Fuji Natura1600 does a very poor job with the colors blue, green and red.  Many of my original shots had these colors as I find them very soothing but the film just seemed to desaturate them. However, the earth tones in the film are outstanding so that was a positive result. In essence. taking a word and using it to inspire a whole collection of photographic motifs is very challenging but extremely rewarding and fun to try. Furthermore, adding sound to the work is a field with which I would like to continue to pursue and hopefully develop into some type of "in-person" sound installation that can be seen and felt on a much more amplified level. In the meantime, this project feels inadequate or incomplete but I am glad I pursued it. 

The Results:

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"Plastic Trees"

 

 

A series of analog images documenting and reinterpreting intimate tree landscapes using plastic that sadly is so much a part of our landscape today. The goal is to explore how this reinterpretation changes our view of the land we live in and explores the very aesthetics the plastic creates. I think back to the poignant scene in the classic film 'American Beauty' where the male character Ricky Pitts shares his favorite movie he has ever recorded of the white plastic bag dancing in the wind among the leaves. This idea shows that even the most disgusting of things, namely litter, can create something profoundly beautiful. 

Camera: Nikon F3

Film: expired Kodak gold 200

What I learned: As disgusting and saddening as plastic is in our landscape, it retains some visual gesture and beauty in both form and color when juxtaposed to trees, leaves and branches. When images are combined in a sequence the plastic becomes like a character in a short story. And in some strange ways the plastic is somewhat ornamental serving to enhance the beauty of these spaces. However, that same plastic can also evoke feelings of "choking,"or "infecting," in a parasitic-like way. And ultimately, one is left feeling quite sad and overwhelmed by the mess litter is causing. 

The Results:

 

The Dumpster Portraits

"The Dumpster Portraits" Part 1

 

A series of analogue photographs with dumpsters, walls, generators, and other surfaces double exposed onto the film with my portrait at the same location. The goal was to discover some kind of "surreal" serendipity and distortion that may occur on the human form/face when combined with the ephemera created with rust, pattern, texture and color. 

Camera: Nikon FE2

Film: Kodak Ultramax400

What I learned: Indeed there are some fascinating things that happen to the face when combined with, in some cases harsh surfaces. Perhaps some metaphors depicting mental illness or deep seeded anxiety. There are also lush beauties in texture and pattern that emerge and dissolve. Some of the results remind me of a polaroid developing. The work inspires me to make a part 2 using 24 different people. The following images are the ones that seem to work best. 

 

The Results: